Daily Litigation

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    Crowell & Moring Adds 'Swiss Army Knife' Atty In Calif.

    Crowell & Moring LLP grew in San Francisco this week, announcing Tuesday that it has added a former state prosecutor and e-commerce in-house counsel who has a reputation as a "Swiss Army knife style of lawyer."

  • Fintech Co. Current Can't Stop Ex-GC's Depo In Bias Case

    Fintech company Current must allow the deposition of its former general counsel in a suit claiming it fostered a discriminatory work culture, a New York federal magistrate judge has ruled though the judge limited the deposition to focus on discrimination the general counsel may have personally experienced or witnessed.

  • Holland & Hart Dodges Deposition Order In Discovery Spat

    A Washington federal judge said from the bench Monday that she would not order the deposition of High 5 Games LLC's defense team for alleged discovery misconduct in a class action accusing the company of targeting gambling addicts, ruling the depositions were not crucial to make a case for sanctions.

  • Judge's Error Reverses Med Mal Atty Sanctions, Panel Rules

    A Pennsylvania Superior Court ruled Monday that a Philadelphia trial court erred by imposing sanctions on counsel in a long-running medical malpractice suit against a hospital, saying sanctions can't be based on a broad courtwide policy attempting to speed up medical malpractice cases.

  • Class Attys Seek 24.4M Tesla Shares For Musk Pay Suit Win

    A stockholder attorney whose team won an order voiding Tesla CEO Elon Musk's $56 billion, stock-based, 10-year compensation package in January urged Delaware's Court of Chancery on Monday to reject as "inherently wrong" the electric vehicle manufacturer's attacks on winning-side, stock-based attorney fee proposals ranging in value from $1.44 billion to more than $7 billion.

  • Credit Repair Law Firm Only Made Problems Worse, Suit Says

    A purported credit repair organization faces a Michigan customer's allegations that the company further damaged her credit at a price of "tens of thousands of dollars" over months in violation of state and federal law.

  • NYU Settles Case Accusing It Of Fostering Antisemitism

    New York University has settled a case brought by three Jewish students accusing the institution of fostering an antisemitic environment in a deal under which the school pledged to address discrimination toward Jewish and Israeli students.

  • NJ Cops Claim Retaliation After Uncovering Prosecutor Fraud

    A detective and a lieutenant with the Warren County Prosecutor's Office have launched a whistleblower lawsuit in New Jersey state court alleging retaliation for their part in uncovering an alleged fraud scheme to improperly collect state grant funds, as detailed in an April special investigator's report.

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    O'Melveny Names New Leaders, Combines Practice Groups

    O'Melveny & Myers LLP announced several new leadership appointments Monday, along with the launch of a combined securities litigation and financial services practice group.

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    Meet The Hunton Andrews Atty Rising To NC Biz Court Bench

    The Hunton Andrews Kurth LLP partner ascending to a spot on the North Carolina Business Court bench has a methodical and meticulous approach well suited to a jurist and a knack for listening that will be equally important in his new role, according to his colleagues.

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    K&L Gates Labor Atty Moves To Cozen O'Connor In Pittsburgh

    Cozen O'Connor expanded its Pittsburgh office this week with the addition of an attorney with nearly two decades of experience in labor and employment law, who moved his practice after more than five years with K&L Gates LLP.

  • NJ Bar Wants To Halt Ban On Out-Of-State Atty Referral Fees

    The New Jersey State Bar Association has asked the state Supreme Court to pause enforcement of a new ethics rule that would bar Garden State certified trial attorneys from paying referral fees to out-of-state lawyers.

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    Ex-OneTaste Staffer Says Atty Forced Her To Play The Victim

    A former employee of sexual wellness company OneTaste is suing her former lawyer, saying he conspired with the FBI to present her as a victim of a forced labor conspiracy while she maintains she was not.

  • Catching Up With Delaware's Chancery Court

    Prince's heirs were left standing alone in a cold world last week after Delaware's Court of Chancery found their attempts to gain control of the late musician's estate too demanding. Delaware's court of equity also waved a wand for Walt Disney and slashed nearly $10 million from a damages award for Sears stockholders. In case you missed anything, here's a recap of all the latest news from Delaware's Chancery Court.

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    Michelman & Robinson Duo Joins Raines Feldman In Chicago

    Raines Feldman Littrell LLP announced Monday that a pair of former Michelman & Robinson LLP attorneys, including its former complex litigation chair, joined the firm's Chicago office as partners.

  • Conn. Firm Sued For Repping Both Parties In Business Sale

    A Connecticut law firm has been hit with a malpractice suit saying an attorney improperly represented both parties in the sale of an interest in a restaurant business and ultimately drafted an agreement that misstated the deal in favor of the seller, leading to a $750,000 claim against the buyer.

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    Armstrong Teasdale Resisted Diversity, Ex-DEI VP Says

    Armstrong Teasdale LLP's former vice president of diversity, equity and inclusion claims the law firm hired her to help it cultivate a more diverse workplace, but then blocked her attempts to make recommendations and improvements before wrongly firing her, according to a lawsuit recently filed in Missouri state court.

  • Fired Atty Only Gets $9K From $1.5M Motorcycle Crash Deal

    A Connecticut appeals court ruled Friday that $9,000 was a fair payment to a personal injury attorney who was fired after he quickly obtained a $100,000 settlement offer for a motorcyclist who eventually settled for $1.5 million.

  • How Reshaped Circuit Courts Are Faring At The High Court

    Seminal rulings from the U.S. Supreme Court's latest term will reshape many facets of American society in the coming years. Already, however, the rulings offer glimpses of how the justices view specific circuit courts, which have themselves been reshaped by an abundance of new judges.

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    Breaking Down The Vote: The High Court Term In Review

    The U.S. Supreme Court's lethargic pace of decision-making this term left the justices to issue a slew of highly anticipated and controversial rulings during the term's final week — rulings that put the court's ideological divisions on vivid display. Here, Law360 takes a data dive into the numbers behind this court term.

  • High Court Flexes Muscle To Limit Administrative State

    The U.S. Supreme Court's dismantling of a 40-year-old judicial deference doctrine, coupled with rulings stripping federal agencies of certain enforcement powers and exposing them to additional litigation, has established the October 2023 term as likely the most consequential in administrative law history.

  • The Sharpest Dissents From The Supreme Court Term

    The U.S. Supreme Court's session ended with a series of blockbuster cases that granted the president broad immunity, changed federal gun policy and kneecapped administrative agencies. And many of the biggest decisions fell along partisan lines.

  • 5 Moments That Shaped The Supreme Court's Jan. 6 Decision

    When the high court limited the scope of a federal obstruction statute used to charge hundreds of rioters who stormed the Capitol, the justices did not vote along ideological lines. In a year marked by 6-3 splits, what accounts for the departure? Here are some moments from oral arguments that may have swayed the justices.

  • The Funniest Moments Of The Supreme Court's Term

    In a U.S. Supreme Court term teeming with serious showdowns, the august air at oral arguments filled with laughter after an attorney mentioned her plastic surgeon and a justice seemed to diss his colleagues, to cite just two of the term's mirthful moments. Here, we look at the funniest moments of the term.

  • Judge Should Have Been Disqualified From Case, Panel Said

    A Washington appeals court panel said a trial judge should have been disqualified over bias concerns raised by metro Seattle's bus agency in a worker discrimination case, according to an opinion that said the judge's order allowing an amended complaint was not a discretionary ruling in the case that would have forbid disqualification.

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