Courts

  • Judge Newman Faces More Hurdles In Bid To End Suspension

    With the dismissal of Federal Circuit Judge Pauline Newman's lawsuit against her colleagues over her suspension, experts say she faces significant challenges in securing a different outcome on appeal or persuading the court's other judges to let her hear cases again.

  • Proof Of Ozy Media CEO's Fraud Is Overwhelming, Jury Told

    A New York federal prosecutor on Wednesday told the jury weighing the fate of Carlos Watson that the evidence presented at trial clearly shows that the former Ozy Media CEO was at the helm of a scheme to deceive investors into backing the struggling news and entertainment startup, by falsely inflating its financials and lying about the company's prospects in order to keep it afloat.

  • Feds Say Guo Ran 'Fraud Empire' As Racketeering Trial Wraps

    Manhattan federal prosecutors urged a jury on Wednesday to convict Chinese dissident Miles Guo for operating his political movement as a vast racketeering conspiracy that "brainwashed" supporters into spending more than $1 billion on scam investments.

  • Atty Says Alaska Judge Reprimand Bolsters 4th Circ. Bias Suit

    A former public defender awaiting a bench ruling on her sexual harassment claims against the federal judiciary said Wednesday that the judge deciding her case should note a recent ruling reprimanding an Alaska federal judge for his "sexualized relationship" with a clerk in which the Ninth Circuit Judicial Council determined that intent was irrelevant.

  • Key Menendez Witness Faces Scrutiny As Closings Drag On

    Closing arguments in U.S. Sen. Robert Menendez's bribery trial are set to go into a fourth calendar day after jurors watched multiple sets of defense counsel Wednesday tear apart the testimony of a key cooperating witness.

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    Tax Court Nominees Vow To Sort Out Post-Chevron Cases

    Three nominees for spots on the U.S. Tax Court assured Senate lawmakers Wednesday that they could resolve cases involving federal regulations and congressional intent after the U.S. Supreme Court overturned the Chevron deference doctrine.

  • Nike Wins Another Look At TM Atty Fees Ruling At 3rd Circ.

    The Third Circuit on Wednesday undid a $5 million attorney fee award to a Pennsylvania clothing manufacturer that sued Nike Inc. for trademark infringement, ordering a federal trial court to look more closely at the specifics of the case to determine if the outcome was truly "exceptional."

  • Bang Energy Drink Co. Ex-CEO Urges DQ Of Ch. 11 Judge

    The former CEO of the company that makes Bang energy drinks urged the disqualification of a Florida federal bankruptcy judge and called for an investigation, alleging that the judge committed misconduct in the company's Chapter 11 case, according to a complaint filed with the Eleventh Circuit.

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    NY Judge Slams 'Whopping' Brief In Terror Suit As Dickensian

    A New York federal magistrate judge lectured attorneys in a lawsuit alleging a Pakistani bank funded terrorism, saying a recent joint status letter exceeded the limit by 70 pages and the parties are turning the case into a modern Jarndyce v. Jarndyce from the Charles Dickens classic "Bleak House."

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    Ocasio-Cortez Seeks Impeachment Of Justices Thomas, Alito

    New York Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez filed articles of impeachment against U.S. Supreme Court Justices Clarence Thomas and Samuel Alito on Wednesday following a year of revelations about their repeated failures to disclose the acceptance of luxury travel and gifts, refusals to recuse in certain cases and other purported ethics violations.

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    Ga. Judge Shakes Off YSL Bid To Step Aside From DQ Fight

    A Georgia state judge has rejected a request from Atlanta rapper Young Thug that she step aside from handling his motion seeking another judge's recusal from his racketeering trial for allegedly colluding with prosecutors in a closed-door meeting with a key witness.

  • Giuliani Urges DC Court Not To Disbar Him Over Trump Work

    Rudy Giuliani on Wednesday urged the D.C. Court of Appeals to let him keep his law license, saying he did not commit misconduct in his work on former President Donald Trump's challenge to Pennsylvania's 2020 presidential election.

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    Thompson Hine Brings On DOJ Prosecutor In Sussmann Case

    Thompson Hine LLP announced Wednesday that it has bolstered its government enforcement, internal investigations and white-collar defense subgroup in Washington, D.C., with a former prosecutor from the fraud section of the U.S. Department of Justice.

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    Former McElroy Deutsch CFO Hits Ch. 11 Amid Theft Cases

    McElroy Deutsch Mulvaney & Carpenter's former chief financial officer filed for bankruptcy in New Jersey this week as he awaits sentencing for embezzling over $1.5 million from the firm over a period of years via fraudulent bonuses.

  • Senate OKs Two DC Judge Noms As 8 Seats Remain Unfilled

    The U.S. Senate confirmed two nominees to the Superior Court of the District of Columbia on Wednesday, as lawmakers try to pick up the pace in filling the local court's persistent vacancies.

  • Baldwin Trial Opens With 911 Call Blaming Assistant Director

    Alec Baldwin on Wednesday began his defense to criminal charges over the "Rust" shooting by playing for a New Mexico jury a 911 recording in which the caller describes the fatal incident as accidental and then blames the film's assistant director for what happened.

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    Calif. Pick Defends Articles On Biological Sex, Judge Diversity

    A state judge nominated to serve on the U.S. Northern District of California bench fended off questions from Republicans about articles she wrote in recent years regarding biological sex and diversity in the judiciary.

  • Texas Chief Justice Calls Pulling IDs Over Fines 'Stupid'

    The chief justice of the Supreme Court of Texas told the Senate Judiciary Committee during a Tuesday hearing on funding civil legal aid that the practice of revoking a person's driver's license for an inability to pay court fees was "stupid."

  • 4th Circ. Finds No Judicial Bias In DOD Contractor's Sentence

    The Fourth Circuit on Tuesday upheld a nine-year prison sentence for a North Carolina woman who fraudulently obtained military contracts valued at over $2.2 million, rejecting her argument that the district judge should've recused himself for bias and calling his admonishment during her sentencing "'ordinary,' albeit strongly worded."

  • Hunter Biden Yanks New Trial Bid Feds Blasted As 'Laughable'

    Hunter Biden yanked his bid for a new trial Tuesday that he argued was warranted based on the district court's purported lack of jurisdiction after a jury found him guilty of felony gun charges, retracting his motion and siding with Delaware federal prosecutors' reasoning after they slammed his arguments as "laughable."

  • Veteran EDNY Federal Prosecutor Joins Covington

    The former Criminal Division chief at the Brooklyn U.S. Attorney's Office has returned to private practice as a partner in Covington & Burling LLP's New York office, the firm announced Tuesday.

  • Top DOJ Litigator Says Competition Issues Are 'Everywhere'

    The senior official leading the U.S. Department of Justice's antitrust litigation efforts said Tuesday she sees a "competition problem" in nearly every American industry, as she discussed the growth in federal antitrust enforcement at an event in Denver.

  • NY Judge In Trump Case OKs Narrow Subpoena For Atty

    An attorney who told reporters he held an impromptu hallway conversation with a New York state judge in the lead-up to February's $464.6 million civil fraud judgment against Donald Trump must turn over any communications he had with the court regarding the underlying action, according to a Tuesday ruling.

  • 3 States Ask High Court To Freeze Biden's Debt Relief Plan

    Three state attorneys general applied to the U.S. Supreme Court seeking to vacate the stay of a nationwide injunction in an effort to pause implementation of a $475 billion student loan debt forgiveness program, saying they are likely to succeed in their attempts to have the program invalidated by the high court.

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    Dems Request Special Counsel To Probe Justice Thomas Gifts

    Two Democratic senators have asked U.S. Attorney General Merrick Garland to appoint a special counsel to investigate whether U.S. Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas' failure to disclose various gifts received during his tenure on the high court amounts to chargeable ethics violations or tax crimes.

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Expert Analysis

  • Series

    Ask A Mentor: How Do I Take Time Off? Author Photo

    David Kouba at Arnold & Porter discusses how attorneys can prioritize mental health leave and vacation despite work-related barriers to taking time off.

  • Law Firms Must Prioritize Mental Health In Internal Comms Author Photo

    The traditional structure of law firms, with their compartmentalization into silos, is an inherent challenge to mental wellness, so partners and senior lawyers should take steps to construct and disseminate internal action plans and encourage open dialogue, says Elizabeth Ortega at ECO Strategic Communications.

  • Our Current Approach To Trial Advocacy Training Is Lacking Author Photo

    The key to trial advocacy is persuasion, but current training programs focus almost entirely on technique, making it imperative that lawyers are taught to be effective storytellers and to connect with their audiences, says Chris Arledge at Ellis George.

  • How Women In Law Can Advance Toward Leadership Roles Author Photo

    Female attorneys in leadership roles inspire other women to pursue similar opportunities in a male-dominated field, and for those who aspire to lead, prioritizing collaboration, inclusivity and integrity is key, says Kim Yelkin at Foley & Lardner.

  • The Case That Took Me From Prosecutor To Defense Attorney Author Photo

    Former Assistant U.S. Attorney Moira Penza, now at Wilkinson Stekloff, recalls the challenges of her first case as a civil defense attorney — a multibillion-dollar multidistrict class action against Allergan — and the lessons she learned about building rapport in the courtroom and with co-counsel.

  • The Importance Of Legal Macroeconomics Education For Attys Author Photo

    Most legal professionals lack understanding of the macroeconomic trends unique to the legal industry, like the rising cost of law school and legal services, which contributes to an unfair and inaccessible justice system, so law school courses and continuing legal education requirements in this area are essential, says Bob Glaves at the Chicago Bar Foundation.

  • Opinion

    It's Time To Hold DC Judges Accountable For Misconduct Author Photo

    On the heels of Thursday's congressional hearing on workplace protections for judiciary employees, former law clerk Aliza Shatzman recounts her experience of harassment by a D.C. Superior Court judge — and argues that the proposed Judiciary Accountability Act, which would extend vital anti-discrimination protections to federal court employees, should also include D.C. courts.

  • What ABA Student Well-Being Standards Mean For Law Firms Author Photo

    While the American Bar Association's recent amendments to its law school accreditation standards around student well-being could have gone further, legal industry employers have much to learn from the ABA's move and the well-being movement that continues to gain traction in law schools, says David Jaffe at the American University Washington College of Law.

  • Series

    Ask A Mentor: How Do I Build Rapport In New In-House Role? Author Photo

    Tim Parilla at LinkSquares explains how new in-house lawyers can start developing relationships with colleagues both within and outside their legal departments in order to expand their networks, build their brands and carve their paths to leadership positions.

  • What Attys Should Consider Before Taking On Pro Bono Work
    Excerpt from Practical Guidance
    Author Photo

    Piper Hoffman and Will Lowrey at Animal Outlook lay out suggestions for attorneys to maximize the value of their pro bono efforts, from crafting engagement letters to balancing workloads — and they explain how these principles can foster a more rewarding engagement for both lawyers and nonprofits.

  • Opinion

    NY Bar Admission Criminal History Query Is Unjust, Illegal Author Photo

    New York should revise Question 26 on its bar admission application, because requiring students to disclose any prior interaction with the criminal justice system disproportionately affects people of color, who have a history of being overpoliced — and it violates several state laws, says Andrew Brown, president of the New York State Bar Association.

  • 7 Ways Attys Can Improve Their LinkedIn Summaries Author Photo

    Lawyers can use LinkedIn to strengthen their thought leadership position, generate new business, explore career opportunities, and better position themselves and their firms in search results by writing a well-composed, optimized summary that demonstrates their knowledge and experience, says Guy Alvarez at Good2bSocial.

  • How Law Firms And Attys Can Combat Imposter Syndrome Author Photo

    Imposter syndrome is rampant in the legal profession, especially among lawyers from underrepresented backgrounds, leading to missed opportunities and mental health issues — but firms can provide support in numerous ways, and attorneys can use therapeutic strategies to quiet their inner critic, says Helen Pamely at Rosling King.

  • The Law Firm Qualities Partners Seek In Lateral Moves Author Photo

    In 2022, partners considering lateral moves have new priorities, and firms that hope to recruit top talent will need to communicate their strategy for growth, engage on hot issues like origination credit and diversity initiatives, and tailor their integration plans toward expanding partners’ client base, says Gloria Sandrino at Lateral Link.

  • Small Steps Can Help Employers Beat Attorney Burnout Author Photo

    Lawyers are experiencing burnout on a massive, unprecedented scale due to the pandemic, but law firms and institutional players can and should make a difference by focusing on small, practical solutions that protect their attorneys’ most precious personal resource and professional commodity — time, says Chad Sarchio, president of the District of Columbia Bar.

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