Food & Beverage

  • May 29, 2024

    Commerce Readies 250% Duty For Cambodian Paper Bags

    The U.S. Department of Commerce determined a nearly 250% final anti-dumping duty rate for certain Cambodia-origin paper shopping bags, saying a company hindered the department's probe into whether the bags were hurting the U.S. through unfairly priced imports.

  • May 29, 2024

    Anheuser-Busch, Tilray Fight Beer Sale Injunction Bid

    Anheuser-Busch InBev and Tilray Brands Inc. want a New York federal court to deny an injunction to a distributor alleging they are interfering with its contract to exclusively export craft beers, saying the contract is unenforceable and the potential harm is only speculative.

  • May 28, 2024

    Ranchers' Claims Again Tossed From Beef Price-Fixing MDL

    A Minnesota federal judge has once again thrown out beef price-fixing claims brought by ranchers who raise cattle and calves, ruling Tuesday that the ranchers still haven't clearly established they are directly affected by the alleged scheme.

  • May 28, 2024

    Agri Stats Can't Duck Or Transfer DOJ, States' Antitrust Suit

    Agri Stats can't transfer or dismiss an antitrust case brought by the U.S. Department of Justice and six states that accuses the third-party data compiler of helping meat processors swap sensitive business information, a Minnesota federal judge ruled Tuesday.

  • May 28, 2024

    Chiquita Ops Chief Says Militant Leader Extorted Company

    Chiquita's former head of Colombia operations took the stand Tuesday for the second time in a trial over the banana company's funding of right-wing paramilitaries, recounting to jurors how he was summoned to the house of a notorious paramilitary boss to convey what he said were threats on the company's business.

  • May 28, 2024

    Catching Up With Delaware's Chancery Court

    Delaware Court of Chancery watchers shifted their focus last week from the courtroom to Dover's legislative hall, as proposed amendments to Delaware's corporate code were finally introduced to state lawmakers. Hearings, decisions and reversals involved Kraft-Heinz, AMC Entertainment and the merger of cryptocurrency companies BitGo and Galaxy. In case you missed it, here's the latest from Delaware's Chancery Court.  

  • May 28, 2024

    Chicken Buyers Defend Additional $37M Atty Fee Ask

    Direct chicken buyers who have inked more than $284 million in price-fixing settlements defended their counsel's request for more than $37 million in what would be their third payout in the massive case, saying the request is consistent with both precedent and past experience.

  • May 28, 2024

    Kroger, Albertsons Must Give FTC Texts, Written Notes

    Claims from a pair of multibillion-dollar grocery giants that a discovery request will pose financial burden held no sway over a Federal Trade Commission in-house judge who last week ordered Kroger and Albertsons to produce text messages and handwritten notes from key employees as part of the agency's merger challenge.

  • May 28, 2024

    Guinness Brewer Beats Appeal In Whiskey Bottle TM Dispute

    The Second Circuit on Tuesday upheld a post-trial order requiring a spirits maker to redesign its bottles after a jury found they dilute Guinness beer maker Diageo's trademark rights for its own whiskey brand.

  • May 28, 2024

    5 Firms To Steer Pair Of Large IPOs That Could Net $1.8B Total

    Private-equity backed hospital billing firm Waystar Holding Corp. and aluminum recycling giant Novelis Inc. on Tuesday launched plans for two initial public offerings that could raise an estimated $1.8 billion combined, guided by five law firms, potentially testing the strength of the IPO market's recovery.

  • May 28, 2024

    Edwards Urges Full Fed. Circ. To Limit FDA Safe Harbor

    Edwards Lifesciences has petitioned the full Federal Circuit to narrow its interpretation of a U.S. Food and Drug Administration safe harbor that essentially allows patent infringement during drug development, arguing that if Congress wanted the statute to be interpreted broadly, "it would have said exactly that."

  • May 28, 2024

    Davis Wright Recruits Kelley Drye FDA Practice Chair In DC

    Davis Wright Tremaine LLP said Tuesday that the head of Kelley Drye & Warren LLP's Food and Drug Administration practice group has joined the firm as an advertising and food and drug law partner in Washington, D.C.

  • May 28, 2024

    Colo. Creates Tax Credits For Agricultural Stewardship

    Colorado farms and ranches that use certain agricultural stewardship practices will be eligible for tax credits of up to $300,000 under legislation signed into law by Gov. Jared Polis.

  • May 24, 2024

    Top Senate Banking Dem Presses DoorDash On Biz Advances

    Food ordering and delivery platform DoorDash has come under fire from the chair of the U.S. Senate's banking committee over merchant cash advance products offered on its platform, with the lawmaker saying the typically high costs of such offerings bear "a troubling similarity to payday lending practices."

  • May 24, 2024

    9th Circ. Says H-2A Employers Must Pay Highest Wages

    The Ninth Circuit on Friday said the U.S. Department of Labor can't let employers pay foreign farmworkers on H-2A visas a lower wage rate, rejecting the department's argument that the matter is moot because the previous harvest season is over.

  • May 24, 2024

    Logan Paul's Energy Drink Co. Sues Boxer For Defamation

    Prime Hydration, led by YouTube celebrity Logan Paul, has accused boxer Ryan Garcia of defamation in Texas federal court over his ongoing campaign to paint the drink in a negative light, including saying it contains harmful chemicals like cyanide that will "hurt you big time."

  • May 24, 2024

    Shuttered Paper Mill Flouted $12M Incentive Deal, NC AG Says

    The state of North Carolina is suing food and beverage packaging company Pactiv Evergreen to recoup $12 million in economic incentives the company allegedly accepted to keep a local mill up and running after it abruptly shuttered the facility last year.

  • May 24, 2024

    Judge Finds Cannabis Tracking Suit Targeted Wrong Agency

    A Colorado maker of cannabis edibles lost its bid to block state marijuana regulators from requiring that cannabis companies buy inventory trackers made by Florida-based Metrc, a nationwide vendor of such tags, when a state judge ruled that the edibles-maker sued the wrong agency.

  • May 24, 2024

    Food Supplier Says Exec Raided Files, Jumped to Competitor

    A senior sales executive at a Massachusetts food distributor spent his final days with the company slipping in after hours and on weekends to print out and photocopy customer records and other trade secrets, before jumping to a direct competitor, according to a lawsuit filed in state court.

  • May 24, 2024

    Biden's Judicial Impact And What's Left On The Wish List

    President Joe Biden secured confirmation of his 200th federal judge Wednesday and has transformed the judiciary by picking more women and people of color than any other president. But the upcoming election season could derail his hopes of confirming many more judges.

  • May 24, 2024

    Software-Aided Price Fixing Under Antitrust Assault

    Claims that companies in the same industry are using software middlemen to fix prices are percolating in federal courts around the country, with cases targeting major operators in residential real estate, hospitality and health insurance, among other areas.

  • May 24, 2024

    NYSE Companies Could Face Heat If Business Focus Changes

    A New York Stock Exchange proposal seeking additional authority to delist companies that enact wholesale business changes after going public could subject certain companies to more scrutiny, attorneys say, though such drastic actions are expected to be rare.

  • May 24, 2024

    Stew Leonard's Sued Over Dancer's Peanut Allergy Death

    The family of a U.K.-born dancer is suing the Stew Leonard's grocery store chain, alleging its failure to update labels of cookies that contained peanuts led to her death at age 25 from an allergic reaction.

  • May 24, 2024

    Feds Prep Dumping Duties On Indonesian, Ecuadorian Shrimp

    The U.S. Department of Commerce preliminarily found that Ecuadorian and Indonesian shrimp were being sold in the U.S. at unfairly low prices, unveiling a slate of tariffs to address the dumping.

  • May 23, 2024

    Entrepreneur Ordered To Pay $15M For Unlicensed Pot Stores

    A New York state court hit a cannabis seller with a $15 million judgment Thursday after he was found to be selling marijuana without a license at seven locations inside the state, according to an announcement by the state's attorney general.

Expert Analysis

  • Series

    Playing Music Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    My deep and passionate involvement in playing, writing and producing music equipped me with skills — like creativity, improvisation and problem-solving — that contribute to the success of my legal career, says attorney Kenneth Greene.

  • Proposed Cannabis Reschedule Sidesteps State Law Effects

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    The U.S. Department of Justice's recent proposal to move cannabis to Schedule III of the Controlled Substances Act provides certain benefits, but its failure to address how the rescheduling would interact with existing state cannabis laws disappointed industry participants hoping for clarity on this crucial question, says Ian Stewart at Wilson Elser.

  • How Attys Can Avoid Pitfalls When Withdrawing From A Case

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    The Trump campaign's recent scuffle over its bid to replace its counsel in a pregnancy retaliation suit offers a chance to remind attorneys that many troubles inherent in withdrawing from a case can be mitigated or entirely avoided by communicating with clients openly and frequently, says Christopher Konneker at Orsinger Nelson.

  • How Real Estate Cos. Can Protect Their IP In The Metaverse

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    The rise of virtual and augmented reality creates new intellectual property challenges and opportunities for real estate owners, but certain steps, including conducting a diligence investigation to develop an understanding of current obligations, can help companies mitigate IP issues in the metaverse, says George Pavlik at Levenfeld Pearlstein.

  • Using A Children's Book Approach In Firm Marketing Content

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    From “The Giving Tree” to “Where the Wild Things Are,” most children’s books are easy to remember because they use simple words and numbers to tell stories with a human impact — a formula law firms should emulate in their marketing content to stay front of mind for potential clients, says Seema Desai Maglio at The Found Word.

  • Patent Lessons From 4 Federal Circuit Reversals In April

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    Four Federal Circuit decisions in April that reversed or vacated underlying rulings provide a number of takeaways, including that obviousness analysis requires a flexible approach, that an invalidity issue of an expired patent can be moot, and more, say Denise De Mory and Li Guo at Bunsow De Mory.

  • Series

    Being An EMT Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    While some of my experiences as an emergency medical technician have been unusually painful and searing, the skills I’ve learned — such as triage, empathy and preparedness — are just as useful in my work as a restructuring lawyer, says Marshall Huebner at Davis Polk.

  • High-Hazard Retailers: Are You Ready For OSHA Inspections?

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    In light of a bill introduced this month in Congress to protect warehouse workers, relevant employers — including certain retailers — should remain aware of an ongoing Occupational Safety and Health Administration initiative that has increased the likelihood of inspection over the next couple of years, say Julie Vanneman and Samantha Cook at Dentons Cohen.

  • Questions Remain After Mass. Adverse Possession Case

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    A recent Massachusetts Land Court decision, concerning an adverse possession claim on a family company-owned property, leaves open questions about potential applicability to closely held corporations and other ownership types going forward, says Brad Hickey at DarrowEverett.

  • Contract Disputes Recap: Saying What Needs To Be Said

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    Edward Arnold and Bret Marfut at Seyfarth Shaw examine three recent decisions that delve into the meaning and effect of contractual releases, and demonstrate the importance of ensuring that releases, as written, do what the parties intend.

  • Exploring An Alternative Model Of Litigation Finance

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    A new model of litigation finance, most aptly described as insurance-backed litigation funding, differs from traditional funding in two key ways, and the process of securing it involves three primary steps, say Bob Koneck, Christopher Le Neve Foster and Richard Butters at Atlantic Global Risk LLC.

  • Del. Dispatch: Chancery's Evolving Approach To Caremark

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    Though Caremark claims are historically the least likely corporate claims to lead to liability, such cases have been met in recent years with increased judicial receptivity — but the Delaware Court of Chancery still expressly discourages the reflexive filing of Caremark claims following corporate mishaps, say attorneys at Fried Frank.

  • Why Employers Shouldn't Overreact To Protest Activities

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    Recent decisions from the First Circuit in Kinzer v. Whole Foods and the National Labor Relations Board in Home Depot hold eye-opening takeaways about which employee conduct is protected as "protest activity" and make a case for fighting knee-jerk reactions that could result in costly legal proceedings, says Frank Shuster at Constangy.

  • Leveraging Insurance Amid Microplastics Concerns

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    A pending microplastics lawsuit — New York v. PepsiCo Inc. — may be a harbinger of what is to come for companies whose products are exposed to the environment, so any company considering how to address microplastics liability should include a careful assessment of the potential for insurance coverage in its due diligence, say attorneys at Haynes Boone.

  • Series

    Teaching Yoga Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Being a yoga instructor has helped me develop my confidence and authenticity, as well as stress management and people skills — all of which have crossed over into my career as an attorney, says Laura Gongaware at Clyde & Co.

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