Wage & Hour

  • June 14, 2024

    NY Bill Taking Aim At Model Worker Abuse Awaits Gov.'s Pen

    The New York State Assembly greenlighted a bill now headed for the governor's desk that creates new worker protections for models that aim to rein in industry exploitation, legislation that would build a registry of modeling agencies and require them to act as fiduciaries for their workers.

  • June 14, 2024

    Ill. Cannabis Co.'s Payroll Provider Suit Revived

    An Illinois appeals court breathed new life into a cannabis dispensary operator's negligence and negligent misrepresentation​ lawsuit against its accounting firm for incorrectly telling the company it was overtime-exempt and causing it to underpay employees, saying the claims may have been brought in time.

  • June 14, 2024

    Popeyes Accused Of Skimping On Breaks And Wages

    Popeyes made employees in California work through lunch and rest breaks without appropriate pay and provided them with "confusing" wage statements, according to a putative class action lodged in a Los Angeles court.

  • June 14, 2024

    Healthcare Worker's Solo PAGA Claim Heads To Arbitration

    A California state appeals court ruled an employee's individual wage claims under the state's Private Attorneys General Act should be heard in arbitration, overturning a lower court's decision to keep the lawsuit in state court and finding the arbitration agreement encompassed the worker's claims.

  • June 14, 2024

    Former IT Worker Wants Outright Win In FMLA Suit

    A former information technology worker asked a Florida federal court Friday to reconsider a win it denied him in his lawsuit alleging he was fired after he took medical leave to treat anxiety, arguing the court should have found his company acted illegally.

  • June 14, 2024

    5 Threats To New DOL Rule Expanding Overtime Eligibility

    A U.S. Department of Labor rule that the agency says would extend overtime protections to an estimated 4.3 million workers in its first year faces opposition in the courts and in Congress that could topple the recently finalized regulations. Here, Law360 reviews five threats to the Biden administration's overtime rule.

  • June 14, 2024

    NY Forecast: Class Cert. Args In Four Seasons Layoff Suit

    This week, a New York federal judge will consider a motion to certify a class of former workers at the Four Seasons Hotel New York who claim the hotel violated federal and state law by not notifying them of furloughs and that the hotel denied them contractually required severance. Here, Law360 explores this and other cases on the docket in New York.

  • June 14, 2024

    Calif. Forecast: Delta's $16M Pay Stub Deal Up For Approval

    In the coming week, attorneys should watch for potential settlement approval in a pay stubs class action against Delta Air Lines that went to the Ninth Circuit and the California Supreme Court. Here's a look at that case and other labor and employment matters coming up in California.

  • June 14, 2024

    Disability Care Co., DOL Ink $500K Deal To End Wage Suit

    A Virginia care company for people with intellectual disabilities will pay about $500,000 to end a U.S. Department of Labor suit alleging it paid employees a flat rate, leading to minimum wage and overtime violations, according to court documents filed Friday.

  • June 13, 2024

    Apple Workers' Suit Says Women Are Paid Less For Same Work

    A pair of Apple workers lodged a proposed class action in California state court Thursday claiming that the company has systematically paid thousands of women less than their male counterparts for substantially similar work for years.

  • June 13, 2024

    New Evidence Triggers Amended Misclassification Complaint

    Growers accusing a chicken farm of misclassifying them as independent contractors can amend their suit, a South Carolina federal judge ruled Thursday, agreeing that new evidence they obtained could expand the suit's reach.

  • June 13, 2024

    Republican Sens. Want To Block DOL OT Exemption Rule

    Republican senators unveiled a Congressional Review Act resolution Thursday aiming to roll back the U.S. Department of Labor's new rule increasing the salary thresholds for overtime exemptions for administrative, executive and professional employees, saying the final rule will raise prices and cut jobs.

  • June 13, 2024

    2nd Circ. Reopens Tow Trucker's Wage Suit

    A New York federal court shouldn't have inserted a subsidiary in a proposed class action accusing an auction service provider of paying tow truck drivers late, the Second Circuit ruled Thursday, reviving the suit.

  • June 13, 2024

    Wage Violation Window Narrowed Before Trial

    A group of workers for a sheriff's office can bring evidence at trial that the county they worked for committed wage violations only within the time period covered by the three-year statute of limitations, which is locked at the moment workers opt in, a Tennessee federal judge ruled.

  • June 13, 2024

    Mass. Court Blesses Broad Liability In BMW Dealer Wage Suit

    An intermediate Massachusetts appellate panel on Thursday ruled that a BMW dealership employee can sue not only her direct employer for wage law violations, but also a separate company that manages the dealership.

  • June 13, 2024

    Courts Grow Dubious Of Approval Obligation For FLSA Deals

    The future of Fair Labor Standards Act settlement approvals is increasingly uncertain, as federal district court judges have been departing from precedent by saying parties can privately settle without court approval. Here, Law360 explores the issue.

  • June 13, 2024

    Perdue Wants Copycat Wage Suit Tossed or Transferred

    Perdue Foods asked a Maryland federal judge Thursday to throw out or transfer to Georgia a chicken grower's suit alleging independent contractor misclassification, saying the claims are identical to another suit in that state the named plaintiff was involved with.

  • June 13, 2024

    Mass. High Court Approves Tipped Wage Ballot Measure

    Massachusetts' highest court on Thursday gave its blessing to a November ballot question asking voters to increase the state's minimum wage for tipped workers, finding that pairing the measure with a provision to allow tip pooling is part of an overall public policy goal to boost wages for all service industry employees.

  • June 13, 2024

    Calif. Residential Care Co. Owes $659K For Wage Infractions

    A Los Angeles residential care company must pay nearly $659,000 in back wages, damages and fines for denying workers their full wages, the California Labor Commissioner's Office announced Thursday.

  • June 12, 2024

    NM Pot Store Chain Unlawfully Keeps Tips, Budtenders Say

    A cannabis retail chain in New Mexico is accused of unlawfully taking tips from its budtenders under the premise that the money would be donated to a charity, according to a proposed class action filed Wednesday in federal court.

  • June 12, 2024

    NY Court Strikes Housing Tax Break's Labor Dispute Process

    A New York state court has undercut a provision in a since-expired affordable housing tax break that enabled a city watchdog to issue judgments against developers who underpaid construction workers, deeming the provision unconstitutional because decisions could not be appealed.

  • June 12, 2024

    Amazon Flex Drivers Seek to Arbitrate Employment Status

    Nearly 16,000 Amazon drivers filed arbitration claims against the e-commerce giant with the American Arbitration Association this week seeking unpaid wages and compensation for work-related expenses because of their misclassification as independent contractors.

  • June 12, 2024

    Conn. Eatery Owners Threatened To Kill Ex-Worker, DOL Says

    A Connecticut restaurant group and its leaders ordered workers to lie to federal investigators during a wage and hour probe and threatened to kill an ex-worker for helping the U.S. Department of Labor, the agency said in a complaint filed in federal court.

  • June 12, 2024

    'Unconscionable' Arbitration Pacts Keep PAGA Suit In Court

    A cemetery and funeral services company can't compel arbitration of two former employees' Private Attorneys General Act lawsuit because the arbitration pacts it gave them are "unconscionable," a split a California appellate panel ruled, affirming a trial court's decision.

  • June 12, 2024

    Ex-Wendy's Worker Drops Suit Over Breast-Pumping Space

    A former Wendy's employee who accused the company and multiple related entities of failing to provide proper private space for workers to pump breast milk despite federal labor laws requiring them to do so has permanently dropped her claims from Ohio federal court.

Expert Analysis

  • Water Cooler Talk: Investigation Lessons In 'Minority Report'

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    Tracey Diamond and Evan Gibbs at Troutman Pepper discuss how themes in Steven Spielberg's Science Fiction masterpiece "Minority Report" — including prediction, prevention and the fallibility of systems — can have real-life implications in workplace investigations.

  • Class Actions At The Circuit Courts: February Lessons

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    In this month's review of class action appeals, Mitchell Engel at Shook Hardy discusses five notable circuit court decisions on topics from property taxes to veteran's rights — and provides key takeaways for counsel on issues including class representative intervention, wage-and-hour dispute evidence and ascertainability requirements.

  • NYC Cos. Must Prepare For Increased Sick Leave Liability

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    A recent amendment to New York City's sick leave law authorizes employees for the first time to sue their employers for violations — so employers should ensure their policies and practices are compliant now to avoid the crosshairs of litigation once the law takes effect in March, says Melissa Camire at Fisher Phillips.

  • Employer Trial Tips For Fighting Worker PPE Pay Claims

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    Courts have struggled for decades to reach consensus on whether employees must be paid for time spent donning and doffing personal protective equipment, but this convoluted legal history points to practical trial strategies to help employers defeat these Fair Labor Standards Act claims, say Michael Mueller and Evangeline Paschal at Hunton.

  • Employer Lessons From NLRB Judge's Union Bias Ruling

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    A National Labor Relations Board judge’s recent decision that a Virginia drywall contractor unlawfully transferred and fired workers who made union pay complaints illustrates valuable lessons about how employers should respond to protected labor activity and federal labor investigations, says Kenneth Jenero at Holland & Knight.

  • 9 Tools To Manage PAGA Claims After Calif. High Court Ruling

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    In Estrada v. Royalty Carpet Mills, the California Supreme Court recently dealt a blow to employers by ruling that courts cannot dismiss Private Attorneys General Act claims on manageability grounds, but defendants and courts can still use arbitration agreements, due process challenges and other methods when dealing with unmanageable claims, says Ryan Krueger at Sheppard Mullin.

  • The 7th Circ.'s Top 10 Civil Opinions Of 2023

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    Attorneys at Jenner & Block examine the most significant decisions issued by the Seventh Circuit in 2023, and explain how they may affect issues related to antitrust, constitutional law, federal jurisdiction and more.

  • Where Justices Stand On Chevron Doctrine Post-Argument

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    Following recent oral argument at the U.S. Supreme Court, at least four justices appear to be in favor of overturning the long-standing Chevron deference, and three justices seem ready to uphold it, which means the ultimate decision may rest on Chief Justice John Roberts' vote, say Wayne D'Angelo and Zachary Lee at Kelley Drye.

  • Calif. High Court Ruling Outlines Limits On PAGA Actions

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    While the California Supreme Court’s ruling last week in Estrada v. Royalty Carpet Mills held that courts cannot dismiss Private Attorneys General Act claims on manageability grounds, the opinion also details how claims can be narrowed, providing a road map for defendants facing complex actions, say attorneys at Gibson Dunn.

  • NY Pay Frequency Cases May Soon Be A Thing Of The Past

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    Two recent developments in New York state have unfurled to suggest that the high tide of frequency-of-pay lawsuits may soon recede, giving employers the upper hand when defending against threatened or pending claims, say attorneys at Reed Smith.

  • A Focused Statement Can Ease Employment Mediation

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    Given the widespread use of mediation in employment cases, attorneys should take steps to craft mediation statements that efficiently assist the mediator by focusing on key issues, strengths and weaknesses of a claim, which can flag key disputes and barriers to a settlement, says Darren Rumack at Klein & Cardali.

  • How To Start Applying DOL's Independent Contractor Test

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    Last week, the U.S. Department of Labor finalized a worker classification rule that helpfully includes multiple factors that employers can leverage to systematically evaluate the economic realities of working relationships, says Elizabeth Arnold and Samantha Stelman at Berkeley Research Group.

  • PAGA Turns 20: An Employer Road Map For Managing Claims

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    As California’s Private Attorneys General Act turns 20, the arbitrability of individual and representative claims remains relatively unsettled — but employers can potentially avoid litigation involving both types of claims by following guidance from the California Supreme Court’s Adolph v. Uber ruling, say attorneys at Mintz.