More Employment Coverage

  • May 31, 2024

    Group Sued Over Immigrants' Benefits Too Late, Panel Holds

    A Michigan state appeals court has nixed a nonprofit's challenge to the court's ruling that working while unauthorized is a crime and that immigrant workers are not entitled to benefits once their unauthorized status is discovered, saying the group brought the lawsuit in an untimely manner.

  • May 31, 2024

    Airport Shops, Ex-Workers Say They Have A Data Breach Deal

    Attorneys for an airport retail company and a worker who says his personal information was compromised in a corporate data breach told a Georgia federal judge Thursday they've reached a tentative deal to bring the proposed class action to a close.

  • May 31, 2024

    NY Appeals Court Backs Trimming Of 50 Cent Liquor Spat

    A New York appeals court has said a lower court rightly dismissed some components of a suit brought by a fine liquors company owned by rapper 50 Cent, allowing Jim Beam and its parent company to escape the rapper's claims they aided a fraud and rejecting his request for punitive damages and attorney fees.

  • May 31, 2024

    Kroger's $6M BIPA Deal With 6K Workers Gets Final OK

    An Illinois federal judge granted final approval to a class of about 6,000 Food4Less employees on their $6 million settlement resolving claims Kroger Co. subsidiary Ralphs unlawfully stored and used their biometric data after requiring them to scan their fingerprints to clock in and out of their shifts. 

  • May 31, 2024

    Off The Bench: NCAA Transfers Freed, Atty Plays Cards Right

    In this week's Off the Bench, the NCAA agrees to more historic rule changes while experts examine its post-House settlement future, and a patent lawyer looks back at his transformation into a poker champion.

  • May 31, 2024

    Texas Judge Opts Not To Recuse And Tosses Chamber Suit

    A Texas federal judge has thrown out the U.S. Chamber of Commerce's suit seeking to block the Federal Trade Commission from implementing a ban on noncompete clauses because a different plaintiff was first to file, adding he declined to recuse himself because no companies in his stock portfolio were parties in the case.

  • May 31, 2024

    NJ Judge Says Mortgage Lender's Counterclaim Falls Flat

    A New Jersey federal judge tossed an unfair competition counterclaim brought by Nationwide Mortgage Bankers Inc. in a trade secrets suit by its rival Paramount Residential Mortgage Group, ruling that Nationwide Mortgage's counterclaim allegations do not actually count as unfair competition under Garden State law.

  • May 30, 2024

    UPenn Retools Fight Against Defamation Suit Over Email

    An email addressing how an anthropology professor handled the remains of the 1985 MOVE house bombing victims cannot be considered defamatory because it was rooted in personal perspectives and not facts, the University of Pennsylvania told a federal court Wednesday.

  • May 30, 2024

    Ex-Chicago Mayor Dodges Atty's Lawsuit Over Zoom Tirade

    An Illinois judge tossed a lawsuit brought by a former in-house attorney for the Chicago Park District accusing former Mayor Lori Lightfoot of unleashing a profane tirade laced with crude, insulting and defamatory comments during a Zoom call.

  • May 30, 2024

    Mich. Supreme Court To Hear Town Benefits Breach Case

    The Michigan Supreme Court has said it will consider whether a village was entitled to coverage for damages it incurred in lawsuits from former employees who sued after the village decided to stop providing lifetime healthcare benefits, ordering oral arguments on an insurer's challenge to a state court's ruling.

  • May 30, 2024

    NCAA Loses Bid To Sink Reggie Bush Defamation Suit

    The NCAA has failed in its bid to get an early toss of the defamation suit filed by 2005 Heisman Trophy winner Reggie Bush, with an Indiana court ruling a dismissal is premature at this point because the former running back has met the pleading standards.

  • May 30, 2024

    'South Park'-Quoting Judge Says CEO Can't 'Blame Canada'

    In a ruling drawing on the show about four foul-mouthed boys from Colorado, a Pennsylvania federal judge said a CEO who sued his former company could not blame Canada for an unfavorable arbitration ruling in a case where he claimed he was wrongly fired from his post.

  • May 30, 2024

    NCAA V. Athletes Suits Paused As Parties Talk Final Deal

    The consolidated cases in the class action against the NCAA over athletes' name, image and likeness compensation were stayed by a California federal judge Thursday, the next step toward finalizing the multibillion-dollar settlement the two sides reached last week.

  • May 30, 2024

    NCAA To End Transfer Rules In Deal With DOJ

    The NCAA agreed on Thursday to stop enforcing all rules governing athletes transferring from one institution to another, as part of a proposed consent decree filed by the U.S. Department of Justice to settle an antitrust suit against the organization by 10 states and the District of Columbia.

  • May 30, 2024

    Ex-WWE Worker Pauses Trafficking Claims For DOJ Probe

    A former World Wrestling Entertainment Inc. paralegal has agreed to put her sexual assault and trafficking lawsuit against the company, founder Vince McMahon and a former executive on hold while the U.S. Department of Justice conducts a "nonpublic investigation," the plaintiff's counsel said Thursday.

  • May 29, 2024

    NC State Is Blocking Probe Of PCBs In Building, Court Told

    North Carolina State University is trying to exploit the judicial process in order to destroy evidence of building contamination, a cancer-stricken professor told a state appeals court Tuesday in a bid to advance plans for a carcinogen inspection.

  • May 29, 2024

    Teacher's Contract Renewal Claim Spiked By Ga. Justices

    The Supreme Court of Georgia ruled Wednesday that a teacher can't sue his former district for denying him a contract renewal after he missed its due date, finding that the lack of a definitive salary figure in the offer doesn't conflict with state law.

  • May 29, 2024

    NCAA Must Face Bulk Of Student-Athlete's W.Va. Transfer Suit

    A West Virginia federal judge will not allow the NCAA to escape the bulk of an antitrust lawsuit filed by a 22-year-old, ruling he sufficiently supported his claims accusing the organization of contract interference when it deemed him ineligible to play basketball after a midseason transfer. 

  • May 29, 2024

    DOJ Requests More Info On $2.2B Employee Screening Deal

    The U.S. Department of Justice has requested more information about employment screening company First Advantage Corp.'s planned $2.2 billion purchase of rival Sterling Check Corp., extending the review period for the merger.

  • May 29, 2024

    Chancery Pins Down Musk, Tesla On Pay Bid, Del. Jurisdiction

    Delaware's chancellor has nailed Elon Musk, Tesla Inc. and their counsel to assurances that the company won't flee state corporate law jurisdiction and a potentially massive stockholder attorney fee dispute by rushing votes on a struck-down, $56 billion compensation plan for Musk and proposed reincorporation in Texas.

  • May 29, 2024

    Greenberg Traurig Adds Jackson Lewis Litigator In Orlando

    Jackson Lewis PC's former Orlando litigation manager has joined Greenberg Traurig LLP as a labor and employment shareholder.

  • May 28, 2024

    The NCAA Put Out One Fire, But The House Is Still Ablaze

    Despite the enormous size of the settlement of a class action by hundreds of thousands of former college athletes over name, image and likeness compensation denied to them, experts say it only resolves one of the NCAA's many legal crises, while shining a light on the severity of the others.

  • May 28, 2024

    Mich. Judge Tosses Ex-Prosecutor's Suit Over Firing

    A Michigan federal judge has dismissed a lawsuit from a fired assistant prosecutor alleging he lost his job at the Macomb County Prosecutor's Office for speaking out about harassment and retaliation, after the county asked for sanctions because the plaintiff wasn't complying with discovery requirements and missed a deposition.

  • May 28, 2024

    Lin Wood Wants Fraud Claims Kept Out Of Defamation Trial

    Controversial attorney Lin Wood has asked a Georgia federal judge to bar his former law partners, who allege he falsely accused them of attempted extortion, from introducing evidence at an upcoming August trial related to two separate and still pending suits filed against him in Fulton County.

  • May 24, 2024

    Airline Worker Terrorized 'Countless' Passengers, Suit Says

    A California man with ties to American Airlines gained access to the private information of regional airline passengers and embarked on a monthslong campaign of harassing them, according to a lawsuit in federal court with 15 plaintiffs.

Expert Analysis

  • Protecting IP May Be Tricky Without Noncompetes

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    Contrary to the Federal Trade Commission's view, trade secret law cannot replace noncompetes' protection of proprietary information because intellectual property includes far more than just trade secrets, so businesses need to closely examine their IP protection options, say Aimee Fagan and Ching-Lee Fukuda at Sidley.

  • How FTC's Noncompete Rule May Affect Exec Comp Packages

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    In the event the Federal Trade Commission's final noncompete rule goes into effect as currently contemplated, companies will need to take stock of how they structure post-employment executive compensation arrangements, such as severance agreements and clawbacks, says Meredith O'Leary at King & Spalding.

  • 8 Legal Issues Influencing Investors In The Creator Economy

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    The rapidly expanding digital creator economy — funding for which more than doubled in the U.S. in the first quarter — comes with its own set of unique legal issues investors must carefully consider before diving in, say Louis Lehot and Alan Pate at Foley & Lardner.

  • E-Discovery Quarterly: Recent Rulings On Text Message Data

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    Electronically stored information on cellphones, and in particular text messages, can present unique litigation challenges, and recent court decisions demonstrate that counsel must carefully balance what data should be preserved, collected, reviewed and produced, say attorneys at Sidley.

  • What's Notable In JAMS' New Mass Arbitration Rules

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    The Judicial Arbitration and Mediation Services’ recently released guidelines, coming on the heels of similar American Arbitration Association amendments, suggests that mass arbitrations will remain an efficient means for consumers to vindicate their rights against companies, say Jonathan Waisnor and Brandon Heitmann at Labaton Keller. 

  • Swimming Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Years of participation in swimming events, especially in the open water, have proven to be ideal preparation for appellate arguments in court — just as you must put your trust in the ocean when competing in a swim event, you must do the same with the judicial process, says John Kulewicz at Vorys.

  • FTC Noncompete Rule May Still Face Historical Hurdles

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    The Federal Trade Commission's final rule banning noncompetes might face challenges that could have been avoided with more cautious consideration of the commission's long history of failed lawsuits that went beyond the agency's statutory authority, as well as the mountain of judicial precedent justifying noncompete agreements in employment contracts, say attorneys at BakerHostetler.

  • A Guide To Using The DTSA For Misappropriation Recourse

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    Nicholas Armington at Mintz explains the ins and outs of drafting a misappropriation complaint under the Defend Trade Secrets Act, and how and why companies should think strategically about federal and state law when filing a claim.

  • Don't Use The Same Template For Every Client Alert

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    As the old marketing adage goes, consistency is key, but law firm style guides need consistency that contemplates variety when it comes to client alert formats, allowing attorneys to tailor alerts to best fit the audience and subject matter, says Jessica Kaplan at Legally Penned.

  • Walking With My Dog Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Thanks to my dog Birdie, I've learned that carving out an activity different from the practice of law — like daily outdoor walks that allow you to interact with new people — can contribute to professional success by boosting creativity and mental acuity, as well as expanding your social network, says Sarah Petrie at the Massachusetts Attorney General’s Office.

  • Think Like A Lawyer: Follow The Iron Rule Of Trial Logic

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    Many diligent and eager attorneys include every good fact, point and rule in their trial narratives — spurred by the gnawing fear they’ll be second-guessed for leaving something out — but this approach ignores a fundamental principle of successful trial lawyering, says Luke Andrews at Poole Huffman.

  • The Art Of Asking: Leveraging Your Contacts For Referrals

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    Though attorneys may hesitate to ask for referral recommendations to generate new business, research shows that people want to help others they know, like and trust, so consider who in your network you should approach and how to make the ask, says Rebecca Hnatowski at Edwards Advisory.

  • Compliance Strategies To Mitigate 3 New Areas Of AI Risk

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    The era of artificial intelligence-assisted corporate crime is here, but several concrete mitigation strategies can allow companies to address the new, rapidly evolving threats posed by deepfakes, information barrier evasion and AI model manipulation, say attorneys at Debevoise.

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