Labor

  • May 21, 2024

    TV Workers Get OK For Union Vote Despite Co.'s Objections

    A National Labor Relations Board official has cleared 22 employees of a Sacramento, California, broadcast news company to vote on representation by a Communications Workers of America-affiliated union next week, rejecting the company's bid for a smaller voting pool.

  • May 21, 2024

    Strategic Hiring Was The New Normal For BigLaw In 2023

    The 400 largest law firms by headcount in the U.S. grew more slowly in 2023 than in the previous two years, while Kirkland & Ellis LLP surpassed the 3,000-attorney threshold, according to the latest Law360 ranking.

  • May 21, 2024

    The Law360 400: Tracking The Largest US Law Firms

    The legal market expanded more tentatively in 2023 than in previous years amid a slowdown in demand for legal services, especially in transactions, an area that has been sluggish but is expected to quicken in the near future.

  • May 21, 2024

    With Ex-Faegre Partner, Norton Rose Adds To ERISA Expertise

    Norton Rose Fulbright has boosted its Washington, D.C., office with an ERISA litigator and experienced labor lawyer who most recently was with Faegre Drinker Biddle & Reath LLP.

  • May 20, 2024

    Justices Turn Away Hospital Construction Feud

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday rejected a case that centers on a $180 million project to expand a Mississippi children's hospital, once again declining to resolve whether parties that agree to certain arbitral rules have also agreed to delegate jurisdictional questions to the arbitrator.

  • May 20, 2024

    Alibaba Resists Class Cert. Over Failed Ant Group IPO

    Chinese e-commerce company Alibaba has again urged a New York federal judge not to certify a class of investors who claim they weren't warned about regulatory risks Alibaba faced in the lead-up to a $34 billion initial public offering of its fintech affiliate, saying the suit's challenged misstatements did not affect Alibaba's stock price.

  • May 20, 2024

    Texas Judge Rescinds Denial Of SpaceX's Rethink Bid

    A Texas federal judge on Monday walked back his decision last week not to reconsider an order transferring SpaceX's National Labor Relations Board constitutionality dispute to a California court, saying he is "awaiting input from the Fifth Circuit."

  • May 20, 2024

    NLRB Resets Bad Faith Line In Bargaining Redo

    A recent National Labor Relations Board ruling that George Washington University Hospital sabotaged union negotiations by demanding unreasonable concessions reinforces that the content of a party's proposals may render them illegal, departing from the Trump-era board's approach in the same case.

  • May 20, 2024

    NLRB Attys Say Mich. Starbucks Injunction Row Must Proceed

    The U.S. Supreme Court's pending decision over a National Labor Relations Board injunction standard shouldn't pause a Michigan federal court case against Starbucks seeking reinstatement of fired employees, the board argued Monday, saying a stay would be detrimental to the workers' interests.

  • May 20, 2024

    NLRB Judge Says Amazon Has 'Proclivity' For Violating NLRA

    Amazon's "proclivity to violate" federal labor law justifies broad remedies including a notice reading at a facility on Staten Island, New York, a National Labor Relations Board judge ruled, finding the e-commerce giant illegally barred a pro-union banner in the break room and threatened workers.

  • May 20, 2024

    UPS Unit's Firing Of Organizer Flouted Law, NLRB Judge Says

    A UPS unit violated federal labor law by firing an employee who led a union drive at a company warehouse in Tracy, California, a National Labor Relations Board judge has ruled.

  • May 20, 2024

    6th Circ. Orders Sanctioned Prison Co. To Pay NLRB Atty Fees

    The Sixth Circuit said a Federal Bureau of Prisons contractor has to pay the U.S. National Labor Relations Board's attorney fees from arguing the contractor should be held in contempt in a dispute over two fired union supporters, with one judge dissenting in part over 0.4 billable hour.

  • May 17, 2024

    UC Says Union Trying To Illegally Strike Amid Campus Protest

    The University of California system is accusing the union that represents its graduate student workers of calling for an illegal strike over the university system's pushback to pro-Palestine campus protests, filing an unfair labor practice charge Friday.

  • May 17, 2024

    Teamsters Unit Says Steel Co. Didn't Follow Rehire Order

    A Teamsters local accused a steel manufacturer of not abiding by an arbitration award that required the reinstatement of a fired employee, urging a Michigan federal judge to make the company cough up back pay and attorney fees.

  • May 17, 2024

    UAW, Fiat Chrysler Say Ohio Workers' Bribery Suit Untimely

    The United Auto Workers and Fiat Chrysler told an Ohio federal judge Friday that a recent Sixth Circuit decision nullifies a racketeering lawsuit from plant workers trying to tie their claims of lost wages and benefits to an illicit bribery scheme involving former union and company officials.

  • May 17, 2024

    NLRB Orders Spa To Rehire Worker Fired Over Wage Talk

    The National Labor Relations Board ordered a Hawaii spa to rehire a worker after the company failed to contest a claim that it fired her for talking to co-workers about their pay.

  • May 17, 2024

    NLRB Restores Union Election Loss, Says Toss Was Improper

    The National Labor Relations Board restored a loss for an International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers local in a representation election at a company in Washington state, saying an NLRB official's decision to erase the loss after finding merit to unfair labor practice allegations doesn't comply with board procedure.

  • May 17, 2024

    Industry Emboldened After Justices Galvanize Agency Attacks

    In the year since the U.S. Supreme Court said "extraordinary" and "far-reaching" attacks on administrative enforcers can skip agency tribunals and go straight to federal district court, ambitious challenges to regulatory powers are rapidly gaining traction, and the high court is poised to put them on an even firmer footing.

  • May 17, 2024

    Mercedes Workers Reject UAW In Blow To Organizing Drive

    Workers at Mercedes-Benz manufacturing facilities outside Tuscaloosa, Alabama, have voted against representation by the United Auto Workers, an early setback for the union as it seeks to organize nonunion automakers in the United States.

  • May 17, 2024

    Texas Judge Denies SpaceX's Rethink Bid In Transfer Spat

    A Texas federal judge won't reconsider his decision to transfer SpaceX's constitutional challenge to the National Labor Relations Board's structure to a California court, saying on Friday that the rocket company didn't give a "compelling reason" to rethink the ruling.

  • May 17, 2024

    NY Forecast: Doctor's Disability Bias Case Goes To 2nd Circ.

    In the coming week, the Second Circuit will hear a former New York University hospital doctor's bid to revive his suit claiming the hospital discriminated against him on the basis of his disability by denying him work accommodations before firing him. Here, Law360 explores this and other cases on the docket in New York.

  • May 17, 2024

    Calif. Forecast: Justices To Hear If Prop 22 Constitutional

    In the coming week, attorneys should watch for California Supreme Court oral arguments regarding the validity of the Proposition 22 ballot measure from 2020. Here's a look at that case and other labor and employment matters coming up in California.

  • May 16, 2024

    Bad Bunny's Sports Firm Says MLBPA Gave It 'Death Penalty'

    Rimas Sports, the sports agency of mega music superstar Bad Bunny, is suing the Major League Baseball Players Association in Puerto Rico federal court, saying the union effectively killed its business with unreasonable sanctions in order to protect its "good ole boy" club of established agencies.

  • May 16, 2024

    5 Ripe Issues For The Biden NLRB To Decide

    The National Labor Relations Board has more than two dozen ripe issues on its docket, including the legality of so-called captive audience meetings, workers’ rights to use company email and chat systems, and compensation for workers whose bosses delay union negotiations. Here, Law360 looks at these and other issues the board could soon decide.

  • May 16, 2024

    JB Hunt Is Not Joint Employer Of Drivers, NLRB Official Says

    United Natural Foods Inc. delivery drivers in Pennsylvania may vote on whether they want a Teamsters local to represent them, a National Labor Relations Board regional director determined Thursday, while finding that J.B. Hunt is not a joint employer of these workers.

Expert Analysis

  • 2 Steps To Improve Arbitrator Diversity In Employment Cases

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    There are prevalent obstacles in improving diversity among arbitrator ranks, but in the realm of employment-related disputes, there are two action items practitioners should consider to close the race and gender gap, say Todd Lyon and Carola Murguia at Fisher Phillips.

  • Cos. Should Consider Virtual Bargaining To Show Good Faith

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    Though the National Labor Relations Board recently determined that a Starbucks union's insistence on hybrid meetings was not an attempt to stall negotiations, the board’s lack of a formal decision on when virtual bargaining might be warranted should warn employers to stay flexible about how they come to the table, says Brandon Shemtob at Stevens & Lee.

  • Employers Must Beware NLRB Noncompete Stance

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    The National Labor Relations Board general counsel’s position that overly broad noncompete agreements could violate federal labor means employers should weigh the potential risks before offering such agreements, even though this issue has yet to come before the board for decision, says Samantha Buddig at Laner Muchin.

  • AI Voice Tech Legal Issues To Consider In The Film Industry

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    As studios create believable and identifiable artificial voice performances, there will be several legal pitfalls that rights-holders should evaluate in the context of rights of publicity, consumers' rights, relevant guild and union agreements, and the contractual language of performers' agreements, says Karen Robson at Pryor Cashman.

  • High Court Labor Ruling Is A Ripple, Not A Sea Change

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    Though the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision in Glacier Northwest v. International Brotherhood of Teamsters looks on the surface like a major win for employers’ right to sue unions for intentionally damaging company property during work stoppages, the ruling may not produce the far-reaching consequences employers hoped for, says Rob Entin at FordHarrison.

  • NLRB's Ruling On BLM Buttons Holds Employer Lessons

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    A recent National Labor Relations Board holding, that two companies violated federal labor law by banning employees from wearing Black Lives Matter buttons, at first seems to contrast with decisions in similar cases, but is based on specific key facts that employers should carefully consider, says Elizabeth Johnston at Verrill Dana.

  • NLRB Outburst Ruling Hampers Employer Discipline Options

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    A recent ruling from the National Labor Relations Board, which restores a worker-friendly standard on protections for profane outbursts during workplace actions, will severely limit employers' disciplinary processes, particularly when employee conduct crosses a line that would violate other federal statutes and regulations, says Michael MacHarg at Adams and Reese.

  • FLRA Ruling May Show Need For Congressional Clarification

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    With its recent decision in The Ohio Adjutant General's Department v. Federal Labor Relations Authority, the U.S. Supreme Court took a somewhat behavioral approach in determining that the guard acted as a federal agency in hiring dual-status technicians — suggesting the need for ultimate clarification from Congress, says Marick Masters at Wayne State University.

  • Cos. Shouldn't Alter Noncompete, Severance Agreements Yet

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    Two recent actions from the Federal Trade Commission and the National Labor Relations Board have sought to ban noncompete agreements and curtail severance agreements, respectively, but employers should hold off on making any changes to those forms while the agencies' actions are challenged, say attorneys at Herbert Smith.

  • Handbook Hot Topics: Remote Work Policies

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    Implementing a remote work policy that clearly articulates eligibility, conduct and performance expectations for remote employees can ease employers’ concerns about workers they may not see on a daily basis, says Melissa Spence at Butler Snow.

  • Water Cooler Talk: Bias Lessons From 'Partner Track'

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    Tracey Diamond and Evan Gibbs at Troutman Pepper chat with CyberRisk Alliance's Ying Wong, about how Netflix's show "Partner Track" tackles conscious and unconscious bias at law firms, and offer some key observations for employers and their human resources departments on avoiding these biases.

  • NLRB GC Memos Complicate Labor Law Compliance

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    Policy memoranda from National Labor Relations Board General Counsel Jennifer Abruzzo outlining new interpretations of the National Labor Relations Act create compliance dilemmas for employer counsel, who must review not only established law, but also statements that may better predict how the board will decide future questions, says Daniel Johns at Cozen O'Connor.

  • NLRB Order May Mean Harsher Remedies For Labor Violations

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    The National Labor Relations Board's recent ruling against a Nebraska meat processor, ordering an expanded range of remedies for the employer's repeated labor law violations, signals the NLRB's willingness to impose harsh remedies more frequently, in the full spectrum of unfair labor practice litigation, say Eric Stuart and Zachary Zagger at Ogletree.

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